On Monday, the United States Secretary of State John Kerry said that North Korea has “not even come close” to making the steps necessaries to hold back its nuclear weapons program to open talks between the countries, adding also the US is considering more sanctions.

During a speech in South Korea, Kerry said that Washington is keeping in the table the offer to the inaccessible North to improve their relationship in return for the end of its nuclear program. “To date, to this moment, particularly with recent provocations, it is clear the DPRK is not even close to meeting that standard,” Kerry said during a news conference with Yun Byung-

“To date, to this moment, particularly with recent provocations, it is clear the DPRK is not even close to meeting that standard,” Kerry said during a news conference with Yun Byung-se, South Korean Foreign Minister.”Instead it continues to pursue nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.”

“Instead it continues to pursue nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.”

DPRK is the official name of North Korea, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, a country that is already under several UN and U.S. sanctions for its nuclear and missile tests.

According to Kerry, is likely that North Korea would be assigned to the International Criminal Court due to its ongoing deplorable practices on human rights and that it was going to be part of further sanctions.

During 2005, Pyongyang rejected a deal with China, South Korea, Russia and the United States to terminate its nuclear program in return for economic and diplomatic rewards.

Recently, North Korea tested a submarine-launched ballistic missile, an action that raised regional tensions that increase the threats that include the development of a nuclear arsenal.

Technically, the North and the South are still at war after the 53’s truce, and regularly North Korea keeps making threats against the biggest ally of the South’s, the United States.

Photo Credit: By World Economic Forum from Cologny, Switzerland (World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2007) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

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